May Pollution Showers – Provocative links from the authors of PRC & Smogtown

Thank you John Oliver. You are our hero. Your fulmination against sweatshops can apply to Western blind spots when it comes to how are “Made-in-China” products are manufactured. We are not worthy! 


 

* CHINESE POLLUTION *

– Beijing’s Air is Now a Little Less ToxicGrist –  

– Here’s What China Closing Coal-Power Plants Means for EmissionsBloomberg Business

–  Why is this City the Worst Air Polluter?CNN –  Himalayas Fail as Pollutants BarrierScientific American 


* CHINESE MONEY *

– The Environmental Impact of China’s Investment in AfricaInternational Policy Digest

– Chinese Developer Leads Transformation of L.A.’ SkylineLos Angeles Times   * CHINA AND COAL V 2.0 *  – Miners of HuaibeiChinaFile

– China’s National Coal Cap Policy Could Save Nearly 50,000 Lives and $6.2 Billion Every Year by 2020Huffington Post


* MADE-IN-AMERICA SMOG * 

– Four in 10 Americans Are Breathing Unhealthy, Polluted Air. Are you? – NBC News

– The Hidden Benefits of Cutting Coal Pollution, and Why They MatterThe Washington Post


* HEALTH * 

 

Luminous review & Chip talks Emissions Frankenstein of a Microwaved Planet As the PRC Finally Gets Ready to Roll

Booklist awards “The People’s Republic of Chemicals” a starred review. Breathe it in while you can.

November 15th, 2014 · No Comments

Riots cops with shields at Qidong protest agailnst industrial waste pipeline

BOOKLIST magazine awards our sequel to SmogtownThe People’s Republic of Chemicals, a starred review!: The Smogtown (2008) authors return with a look at China’s air pollution problem, and it is a doozy. Combining a crash-course history lesson that includes everyone from Confucius to Chairman Mao with a withering rant about the country’s nonexistent environmental policies, Kelly and Jacobs give readers everything they need to know about why China is ground zero for the planet’s future, including its coal bases serving as “global warming daggers.” There is a lot to take in here, and the narrative’s power is as much due to its style as substance. The prose is sharp, vivid, and direct, leading readers through hard-hitting chapters about the Beijing Olympics, America’s Walmart, made-in-China addiction, and the casual way in which ecostatistics are manipulated. Kelly and Jacobs pillory the actions of as many American politicians as Chinese, noting policy missteps and political weakness with a take-no-prisoners attitude that readers will find refreshingly candid. While the tone can sometimes seem a bit glib, its bracing nature will likely be a tonic to those seeking a straightforward take on this urgent subject while also making for a surprisingly enjoyable read. — Colleen Mondor

* Back from the Big Apple book tour, Part I. Here are the links where I talk Frankenstein of emissions on The StreetAOL-Huff Post Live & Brainstormin’